During your divorce, you and your ex will have to decide where the kids will live. Your Barrie divorce lawyer might suggest that you try to keep your children in the same school, regardless of who takes custody of them, because divorce is a time of upheaval for everyone involved—and changing schools forces them to start over.

Conversely, switching schools might be a welcome change for some kids. Talk to your family and yourBarriedivorce lawyer before you make any big decisions about changing schools so you can make the most informed choice.

Enroling Kids in School: Who’s Responsible?

The custodial parent is usually responsible for enroling kids in school. Generally, the kids will go to school in the custodial parent’s district (unless there’s a court order or some other reason to have the kids attend elsewhere). This is particularly important when parents divorce before kids are school-aged.

If your ex gives you a hard time about enroling your children in school, or if you’re having difficulty doing so through the district, let your Barrie divorce lawyer know. He or she will probably be able to work with you to get your ex on the same page and get your kids in school.

Challenges of Changing Schools

When kids have to change schools, they might have difficulty making new friends, adjusting to a different curriculum and communicating their needs with you. Since kids lack the emotional maturity adults have, they might act out in frustration.

If your kids do have to change schools, ask your Barrie divorce lawyer if he or she knows a local counsellor or therapist who can talk to them (and you) through this tough time.

As a parent, you can make the transition a little easier on your kids. You can:

  • Wait to switch schools until the end of the semester or the end of the school year. That way, your kids will get some closure, and all their loose ends will be tied up.
  • Find extracurricular activities your kids will enjoy so they have more opportunities to meet people, stay busy and have a little fun. If you move during the summer, even better—your kids will get a head start.
  • Meet with educators at the new school before your kids start. You can find out whether the school will assign another student to show your kids around, whether there are support systems in place for new students and what sort of academic performance the school requires.

Talk to your kids frequently about changing schools. By showing your kids you’re available (and that you care), they’ll understand they can use your help sorting out their feelings and working through this challenging time.