Collaborative Family Law Firm with Offices in Toronto, Barrie, Mississauga, Aurora & Scarborough

Gelman & Associates is your collaborative family law firm

Every lawyer at Gelman & Associates is prepared and experienced when it comes to assisting clients with all matters related to family law. In addition, we have a number of lawyers who are specifically trained and certified to practice Collaborative Family Law.

The Collaborative Family Law Process

Divorce often conjures up images of nasty disputes between both parties. The Collaborative process, however, is a team approach to resolving legal issues.  Both spouses each engage a collaboratively trained lawyer and work together through a series of four-way meetings to arrive at a mutually satisfactory Separation Agreement.

Promoting constructive dialogue between couples in order to achieve their desired outcomes is a key reason that the Collaborative practice has been gaining traction over the past several years.

It’s not surprising. Working together stands in sharp contrast to contested divorces which are public, time consuming, and much more expensive.

Contact Gelman & Associates to meet with a Collaborative Family Lawyer

The lawyers at Gelman & Associates trained in Collaborative Family Law are:

To book a consultation with one of our experienced Collaborative Family lawyers, please contact Gelman & Associates at (416) 736-0200 or use our contact form online.

From the Blog

Latest posts from the Gelman & Associates blog

14

Revisiting The Considerations Around Relocating a Child

One of the more difficult issues to solve when it comes to matters of child custody and access is what to do when one of the parents of a child wishes to move, with the child, to a location further away than they already are from the other parent. A recent decision from the Superior …


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06

Access by a Non-Parent

Sometimes a party will seek access to a child even when that party is not the child’s biological parent. In a recent case, an Ontario court considered a man’s request for access to a child that he had not seen for over a year. Interestingly, that child was also not the man’s biological son. The …


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31

What’s In A (Attempt To Change A) Name?

It’s natural for divorced or separated parents to disagree over how certain elements of raising their children are handled. Some issues may seem small in nature, but others can be larger and come with long-lasting impacts. In an example of the later, an Ontario mother recently wanted to change the name of the children she …


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